sauerkraut patties will save your life

I learned how to make sauerkraut patties (essentially vegetarian burgers) from the lovely people down at Camp Mainusch. Soon I will use them to take over the world. Once properly aged (hardened) they also make good frisbees/hand grenades. This is also one of the most flexible recipes of all time, and every single one of the ingredients involved is incredibly cheap (plus the flexibility means you can use it to make use of whatever you have around). Once you get the basic idea there is no end to the patty flavors you will be able to make, and sauerkraut is one of the healthiest foods there is. These are instructions for my standard sauerkraut patty.

Ingredients:
>sauerkraut (one or two bags, yes you can purchase sauerkraut in bags, but probably not if you are in America, here in Germany a bag is about 40 cents)
>oats (the amount will depend on how much moisture you’ve got in your patty dough)
>a few pinches of the flour of your choice (optional, but can help with the consistency, I usually leave it out)
>salt/pepper/garlic/spices of choice
>onions (optional, despite their high super-hero factor)
>grated zucchini/carrots/other grate-able veggie (also optional)
>beans or whatever else you have around (lentils, sunflower seeds, quinoa, or crushed nuts all work well)
>your frying oil of choice

Instructions:
Fry the onions and the beans (if using) until the onions are browned and the beans softened. In a large bowl, combine the sauerkraut, grated veggies, onions, beans, and spices (salt, pepper, garlic, and curry paste, if you’re me most of the time) with a few handfuls of oats. Keep adding oats and pinches of flour until the mixture reaches a consistency just sticky enough to form patties that do not fall apart in your hand. Heat up a generous amount of oil in a frying pan and fry patties until browned on both sides, adding oil as necessary. Wa-la! You are finished. Commence to gorge.

Disclaimer: The Beard and I attempted to make these in the United States, but could only find sauerkraut in a can, AND IT WAS AWFUL. So awful that we, dumpster divers both, actually threw away the whole bowl of dough and started again sans kraut. You have been warned. There ain’t no kraut like Kraut kraut.

Further disclaimer: Sauerkraut patties will not actually save your life.

Do you have any patty-making recipe secrets?

This post was a part of Pennywise Platter at The Nourishing Gourmet, Fresh Bites Friday at Real Food Whole Health, Freaky Friday at Real Food Freaks, Farmgirl Friday at Dandelion House, Fight Back Friday at Food Renegade, Friday Potlcuk at Ekat’s Kitchen, Your Green Resource at Live Renewed, Make Your Own Monday at Natural Family Awareness, Monday Mania at The Healthy Home Economist, Homestead Barn Hop at The Prairie Homestead, Midnight Mania Meatless Mondays, and Hearth and Soul Blog Hop at Penniless Parenting.

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Thursday October 06th 2011, 10:00 am 17 Comments
Filed under: conspiracies,food,recipes

17 Comments so far. Please leave a comment.

I’m presently making a big bucket of homemade sauerkraut using a bunch of dumpstered cabbage (and some carrots and onions). Can’t wait to try this!

Comment by John 10.06.11 @ 11:06 pm

Yah! Bringing Sauerkraut back to germany.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzYdDHu52DE

Those sound good and worth a try

You can actually buy bagged Kraut in Canada…and Minnesota (http://kisselcabbage.com/products)

Comment by Peter 10.06.11 @ 11:55 pm

I am usually too lazy for patty-making, but this sounds really interesting. Think sauerkraut from a jar would work?

Comment by Frugal Vegan Mom 10.07.11 @ 3:33 am

Thank for you for the canned Sauerkraut warning! I guess it can be substituted with something else. Like cabbage.

Comment by Will 10.07.11 @ 6:08 am

You know, I live in Korea and this really makes me wonder if one can make kimchi patties… ;)

Comment by Naomi 10.07.11 @ 7:26 am

John: Hell yeah dumpster cabbage kraut!

FVM: I think the main problem with the sauerkraut we got in a can was that it was just terrible sauerkraut. So if you like the taste of what’s in the jar, then it should work. The white wine sauerkraut here has a really mild taste, which lends itself to the burgers because the mildness means that it doesn’t overpower the other awesome flavors in the burgers. So I suppose I would recommend using a kraut that has a mild taste most of all.

Will: Why not?! Tell me how it works out if you try it!

Naomi: I bet that would work well too! The awesome thing about using sauerkraut in these is that they really help the burgers stay together. Let me know how they turn out if you ever try making kimchi burgers…

Comment by clickclackgorilla 10.07.11 @ 11:14 am

Hmm this could be just the solution for the load of sauerkraut I made when I got a little overzealous with a cabbage and which has been languishing ever since… I also make a fabulous sauerkraut/bean/sausage/beer soup but it isn’t quite cold enough for it yet.

Comment by fishinthewater 10.07.11 @ 2:22 pm

One head of cabbage makes so much kraut. I’m excited to find this recipe as a way to use it up! By the way, LOVE your blog! I have always been fascinated/enamored with the idea of intentional communities. To me, it is the epitome of sustainable living! Sadly, I will probably never make the leap unless there is a nuclear holocaust. So it’s nice being able to live vicariously through you…

Comment by Ginny 10.17.11 @ 7:16 pm

Do you have a good sauerkraut recipe? Being in the US means we don’t believe that sauerkraut exists, so says my German friend here. This sounds like a good patty recipe though. Making veggie patties has been on my mind lately and this would be great to have on hand. :D

Comment by Jade 10.20.11 @ 4:46 pm

Ginny: Thanks! And thanks for stopping by.

Jade: You know, I actually don’t. I have to admit I’ve never tried making it myself. In the States I never really ate it, and now that I live in Germany, I tend to leave it to the kraut experts and buy it. But it’s an experiment I’d certainly like to try at some point. Anyone have a good sauerkraut recipe to share??

Comment by clickclackgorilla 10.21.11 @ 5:54 pm

The Amish near us make our kraut sooo delish. It comes in a glass jar (no BPAs) and the only ingredients are cabbage, spring water, and salt. Fermented for 6 months in wooden barrels.

Curious, does the patty retain the tartness once fried? This sounds awesome!

Comment by Jen 11.04.11 @ 9:16 pm

I love kraut! I keep meaning to try homemade – your recipe reminded me. Thank you for linking this to Your Green Resource. What a fascinating site you have!

Comment by Andrea @ The Greenbacks Gal 11.05.11 @ 1:17 am

My husband is drooling now. I don’t care for plain sauerkraut but this has potential. We can get kraut in bags where we are in Missouri, also in jars. He might just try this.

Comment by kathy 11.05.11 @ 4:25 pm

Thank you for your submission on Nourishing Treasures’ Make Your Own! Monday link-up.

Check back tonight when the new link-up is running to see if you were one of the top 3 featured posts! :)

Comment by Lea H @ Nourishing Treasures 11.13.11 @ 3:33 pm

Sauerkraut patties looks delicious, as you said getting here is difficult. Thanks for sharing with Hearth and soul blog hop.

Comment by Swathi 01.12.12 @ 9:49 pm

I just made these – they are awesome! I’m in Scotland, and used Kapusta Kwaszona from the Polish round the corner. I added grated carrot, some sesame seeds and an egg. Yum!

Comment by Makey-Cakey 02.04.12 @ 5:10 pm

Hello,

recipe sounds great but could you give hint of the amount of each ingredient or is it totally irrelevant (can’t imagine ;-)?

Thanks!

Comment by Eddy 07.04.13 @ 6:21 am




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